Eyebright Infused Oil – Magical and Mundane Herbalism

I finished this oil the other day. I didn’t originally intend for it to be a blog post seeing as its use for me personally is purely magical. Nothing to really do with heathenry or homesteading. Seeing as my blog is mostly recipes and how to’s however I changed my mind. When I can get back to learning more self sufficiency promoting skills I will blog about them! 

I have found that many Heathens I personally speak to and have friendships with have some sort of magical practice they either incorporate into their faith or keep to the side. Separate in most ways other than the type of magic you would find in ritual. I am the same as I have stated in older blogs. With this particular entry I will be going over Eyebright infused oil and some usages. Both magical and mundane.

Eyebright is used medicinally for…you guessed it! Eye health! Inflammation, disorders, styes, etc. The entire plant above the roots are used medicinally. It is full of antioxidants, violate oils, vitamins (such as B, C and E), tannins and more to aid in much more than just eye health! It’s popular use as a supplement made it both easy and difficult to find. Powder stuffed capsules are found in any health food store and often even at large grocery stores. They are even found online easily on sites such as Amazon, as an ingredient in pre-made concoctions, etc. Finding the powder (I would have preferred it not be powdered but I wanted anything at that point in my search) alone proved much more difficult. I found some on sites I wasn’t sure were legitimate and for oddly priced bags on Amazon. I almost gave up until I found it at our co-op in the herbs section. It was powdered as usual but I was happy to see it. My husband prepared a bagful for me and we went on our way. So even though I could find it pre-prepared the thought of wasting so much plastic and the gelatin capsules bothered me. Also, who has time to pop open those things individually? This parent does not! 

Some energetic/magical properties include: working air elementals and the element itself, clearing the mind, increasing mental and psychic powers, clairvoyance, seeing the truth, seeing things for what they really are, etc. I made it to potentially help me see through situations. To determine if emotions and such are clouding my perception. 

Sounds hoaky and woo woo to many but I’m okay with that. I am about to be 29 and I’ve been doing this actively and knowingly since I was 12 with family. I’m used to it. 

I don’t have pictures of the process of starting the oil but I have an older blog that goes over that. Essentially, I just put the powder in a jar and then completely covered it with my carrier oil of choice. Leaving only enough room at the top of the jar to shake it. Because it is a powder I mixed it to make sure the oil filled all of the available space before topping off. Then I let it brew. Shaking daily. I left it for a few months but two weeks minimum should do the trick. 

To strain I first used the finest strainer I had. The powder makes it difficult to strain but I did the best I could. There are probably tools out there for this but nothing more available in this kitchen. 



I put the most powder free amount of oil in an amber bottle with a dropper for dripping into concoctions, the powdery slush I left in the jar for rubbing on candles and the in between oil I put in a jar I could easily dip my fingers into for anointing. Powder will sink to the bottom if you want to pour the top off into other jars. Then I stored these all in our herbal cupboard out of the sunlight.

I hope some of you found this helpful if magical oil infusing interests you! You can do this for medicinal use as well to make topical massage oils. 

Calendula Tincture

I have always had an interest in herbalism. Over the years I have made healing foods and drinks, natural bath/body and home products, blends for various uses, etc from store bought, Wild harvested and home grown goods. My husband says plants are my thing (his are crystals/stones/minerals). I tend to focus on certain skills and crafts for extended periods of time and recently pulled out of a crochet mania to study and “play” again. A really great herbal magazine and family herbalism course came into my life at the same time my mind started to wander back and I took it as a sign. 

One of the first things I did was start making tinctures. Inspired by the course I started first with vanilla extract. I want that to brew for a longer period than the minimum suggested so instead I am turning to what I started next for my first blog on the subject. A calendula tincture. 

I have various skin issues that have been with me for much of my life. It’s a combination of genetics, diet and potentially other issues such as inflammation. I looked into breastfeeding safe herbs I could ingest as part of a regime to heal myself and calendula came up as an option. I had just enough for a small batch and got towork! 

Some uses of calendula can be found here: https://www.google.com/amp/s/draxe.com/calendula/amp/

I took my dried calendula I put in my tea and crushed it a bit in one of my mortar and pestles. 

It came out to just over 1/2 cup not being pressed down or fully powdered. I considered it half a cup. 

I then added a full cup of 100 proof vodka (80+ is best though some say 90+ proof). For this particular plant it was suggested to do a 1:2 ratio. Others may be different so look into different information on plants if you plan to make a tincture. Some dried herbs suggest adding distilled water but for this I decided not to. 

I put the ingredients in a jar and stored in my herb cupboard. It is preferred not to have air space like mine but it wouldn’t fit into any other jars I had so I took a chance. It turned out fine. I probably wouldn’t risk it again however. 

I shook it every day for the period I had it brewing. Then I let it sit undisturbed 24 hours before straining. The minimum suggested is 2 weeks of shaking plus 1 day of rest. I left mine for almost a month and strained right before the New Moon. I may be a Heathen but I have a witchy side as well. The longer the better is a general rule for tinctures. 

Once done I strained it in a plastic strainer. I have seen suggestions not to use any metal so I take that advice. 

The herbs really soak up a lot so I would pressed it out well, let it rest then go at it again. 


My funnels have not yet arrived so I placed the amber glass bottle in a bowl to catch any of the tincture that might spill and used a measuring cup to pour. 

I put the tincture in several smaller bottles (2oz) but any size or amount works. I bought mine off of Amazon but usually buy locally despite the large price difference. 

Label with the name and date bottled! My handwriting is awful. I use tape to stick paper on mine but you can get fancy with special labels! 

Tinctures last several years if stored properly. I’ll be adding a few drops a day to coffee or tea daily. Starting off small and building up to more drops as this is a new-to-me tincture. You can take directly on the tongue or add to food or drink like I do. 

Be sure to look out for future tincture and herbalism blogs! I’m only an aspiring herbalist so please do your own research!

Banana Oat “Cookies” Two Ways 

When our bananas get a bit overripe I almost always use them to make banana bread. Today, I decided to put them to use in “cookies” instead. Based on a recipe for diabetic cooking that consisted of only three ingredients. They are less friendly now but great for people with certain allergies. 

I had four bananas and the cookie recipe I have asks for two. So I made two different batches! One of course inspired by banana bread. Both have the same handling and baking instructions though which makes it easy! 

Cookie One – Banana Bread Inspired
You will need:

*2 ripe bananas (the riper they are the sweeter they are)

*1/2 steel cut oats 

*1/2 cup crushed walnuts

*1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 

*1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

Cookie Two – Double Chocolate
You will need:

*2 ripe bananas

*1/2 cup steel cut oats

*1 tablespoon Dutch cacao powder

*1/3 cup (or 1/2 if you’d like) chocolate chips

*1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 

This recipe shows instructions per batch:

Wash hands thoroughly. 

Peel and break apart the bananas. 

Add oats to bananas and mush together as much as you can. 

At this point depending on what batch you are making add the rest of the ingredients and stir well. 

Bananas Bread:


Chocolate:







Cover or alternatively place in Tupperware or a jar and store in the fridge for a minimum of 2 hours. Many recipes suggest baking immediately but the oats taste too hard to me when I do that. So I let them sit. Overnight is best. 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Prepare a cooking sheet with grease/oil/butter/nonstick tin foil.

Take out and use a tablespoon to scoop out individual bits that you will form into cookies. I used a mini ice cream scooper and set them 2 inches apart on the cookie sheet. 

Bake for 10 minutes before taking them out to press down gently with a spatula or the back of a spoon. Bake for another 5 minutes.

Let sit on sheet for 5 minutes then move to a cooling rack. If you do it earlier they will likely break apart.

Enjoy when cool! 

Natural Bug Repellent 

In a group I help run I posted about a natural bug (and arachnid) repellent I was making for our porch and patio today. It was essentially half my essential oils and a stick of cinnamon I soaked in a half and half vinegar/water mix. There are many different oils and herbs one could procure to help ward off a variety of bugs without chemicals. 

Some of these include:

*Lavender

*Citronella

*Lemongrass

*Tea Tree

*Eucalyptus

*Mint (any kind)

*Marigold

*Geranium

*Cedarwood

*Rosemary

*Citrus – Lemon, Lime, Orange, Grapefruit, etc. 

*Cinnamon

*etc. 

I usually do a mix of what I have on hand to ward off different types of bugs but if you have a specific pest you can easily find specific herb/s for them.

After I have made my repellent I either add a cup to a gallon of water and wash the porch with it or I put it in a spray bottle and spray around door and window frames, etc. I would avoid getting this near your plants. If you have children or animals I would spray where they can’t lick or touch it and/or use only safe ingredients that won’t harm them if accidentally consumed.

If I’m making something for the skin I use half witch hazel instead of vinegar and put it in a spray bottle. Be careful not to spray too close to clothing as it can stain. Spraying on shoes or socks before a hike is helpful. 

Alternatively, you can add a 2% dilution of these oils to body lotion and do a rest patch to make sure you are not allergic. Please look into the properties of the oils before attempting this. I am just giving suggestions as a place to start researching. 

Here is a basic bug repellent I used to make: 
Witch Hazel soaked in fresh Geranium and Marigold (then strained!), Spring Water, Essential Oils of Lavender, Peppermint, Lemongrass, Eucalyptus, Tea Tree and Citronella. 

I don’t have the exact amounts as I do things as I go without recipes half the time. I would still make a 2% dilution of the oils. The herbs should be soaked 1-2 weeks. Dried works as well. 

I hope this proves helpful in the warm months ahead! 

Cheesy Potato Bread Rolls

I love potatoes. When people say “bread is life” I think: “right after potatoes.” When combining the two I feel as if I am creating pure joy. In this blog post I’m sharing one of my versions of potato bread but I’m making it into rolls then adding a bit of cheese to the mix. Because cheese too is life. Unless you’re lactose intolerant and also gluten intolerant. Then maybe not.

I was very surprised I had not posted a blog about potato bread yet as I make it fairly often. Growing up one of my favorite sandwich breads from the regular grocery store was (is) potato. Homemade potato bread isn’t quite the same unless perhaps you are using potato flakes (instant mashed potatoes) or spend time breaking down potatoes into a thin liquidy purée. Even then the texture is different. I like my potato bread with some small clumps because I am a fan of the feeling. 

You can easily double this recipe but I use this as is generally due to my husband being gone frequently. So my toddler and I gobble these up over a few days span (sometimes). 

You will need:

*4 1/2-5 cups flour (1/2 cup for kneading)

*1 1/2 cups shredded cheese 

*1 cup warm milk (I used cashew in these pictures as it’s what I had)

*1/2 cup mashed up potatoes (I use red for the sweetness)

*1 stick melted butter (1/2 cup)

*2 tablespoons sugar

*2 teaspoons salt

*1 tablespoon dry active yeast

*1 egg 

I like to boil or bake potatoes for meals but generally make extra for other meals or bread. Here I had three small boiled red potatoes in my fridge. Mashed up they made half a cup. The picture shows more but I just had not smashed them into the cup fully. I mash what I have first to see if I should double the recipe or not. It depends on the amount of potatoes I have made generally. You can also use leftover prepared mashed potatoes. 

Add the yeast, sugar and milk together. Stir well and then let sit for 5 minutes. 



Add the butter, egg, half a cup (at least but hey…go crazy) of shredded cheese of your choice and salt. I also added a pinch of dill, a pinch of turmeric and a teaspoon of nutritional yeast. You definitely don’t need to add these but I like it. You could add other herbs and spices for a more complex flavor to the bread if you would like however! Rosemary is also great.

Mix by hand with a wooden spoon or with the paddle attachment of a mixer.

When fully mixed add half a cup of flour at a time up to 4 cups. 

Remove the paddle attachment (use a spoon to pull any dough off) and add the dough hook if you are using a mixer. Add another half cup regardless of hand mixing or using a mechanical mixer. 

After mixing if the dough still looks sticky you can add up to another half cup. 

When fully mixed by the mixer I still like to knead by hand. It gives me a better idea of the texture of the bread and what it may need. Use up to half a cup of flour for this. The weather, temperature in your kitchen, etc can all effect the dough. 

Place into a greased bowl and cover. Let sit 1-2 hours. Some recipes suggest placing it in the fridge for 24 hours then letting it come to room temperature and rise. I’m too impatient for this. Though I have tried it before and it doesn’t seem to make a huge difference. Do what feels right to you! Experiment! 

When the dough has risen pull apart into desired sizes. I generally don’t pay attention to numbers and just pull apart to size. Be aware they will puff up so make them a bit smaller than you would like. 

Use both hands to pinch and tuck the dough into itself to form the rolls. You can alternately just roll them into balls.


I stuffed some with extra cheese because why not?

The best way to make these rolls is to put them in a glass dish like this. Grease and add rolls with room to spare.

I also put some on our ugly old cookie sheet to show the difference in baking coming up…

Let rise 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. 

Brush with oil or butter if desired then bake for 30 minutes. 

Remove and add cheese! Then bake for an additional 10 minutes or until the cheese is melted. 


With the glass dish you are able to add much more cheese. The pieces are closer together and the sides keep cheese in.

With a cookie sheet a lot of cheese falls off so you both need to add less and also watch for burning. You can stick the rolls closer together but some may still miss out.

This is what happens with the cookie sheet. Some bits were too cooked and I had to crumble them off. The upside is you’re not pulling rolls apart and leaving softness exposed.

Here they are with the glass. They are much more moist!

Let cool for 5-10 minutes or so before serving. You don’t want to burn your mouth with hot cheese! With the glass you let let the rolls sit in the container before removing. With the cookie sheet use a spatula to remove right away and set on a cooling rack. 

Enjoy!